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9786155564987 - James Fenimore Cooper, Murat Ukray: The Last of the Mohicans - Könyv

James Fenimore Cooper, Murat Ukray (?):

The Last of the Mohicans (2015) (?)

Szállítás: Amerikai Egyesült ÁllamokÚj könyveBook, e-Book, digitális könyvtermék a digitális letöltés
ISBN:

9786155564987 (?) vagy 6155564981

, ismeretlen nyelv, eKitap Projesi, eKitap Projesi, eKitap Projesi, Új, eBook, digitális letöltés
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It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes. Still there is so much obscurity in the Indian traditions, and so much confusion in the Indian names, as to render some explanation useful. Few men exhibit greater diversity, or, if we may so express it, greater antithesis of character, than the native warrior of North America. In war, he is daring, boastful, cunning, ruthless, self-denying, and self-devoted; in peace, just, generous, hospitable, revengeful, superstitious, modest, and commonly chaste. These are qualities, it is true, which do not distinguish all alike; but they are so far the predominating traits of these remarkable people as to be characteristic. It is generally believed that the Aborigines of the American continent have an Asiatic origin. There are many physical as well as moral facts which corroborate this opinion, and some few that would seem to weigh against it. The color of the Indian, the writer believes, is peculiar to himself, and while his cheek-bones have a very striking indication of a Tartar origin, his eyes have not. Climate may have had great influence on the former, but it is difficult to see how it can have produced the substantial difference which exists in the latter. The imagery of the Indian, both in his poetry and in his oratory, is oriental; chastened, and perhaps improved, by the limited range of his practical knowledge. He draws his metaphors from the clouds, the seasons, the birds, the beasts, and the vegetable world. In this, perhaps, he does no more than any other energetic and imaginative race would do, being compelled to set bounds to fancy by experience; but the North American Indian clothes his ideas in a dress which is different from that of the African, and is oriental in itself. His language has the richness and sententious fullness of the Chinese. Philologist
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Kategória: History
Kulcsszavak: The Last of the Mohicans James Fenimore Cooper, Murat Ukray Americas History 9786155564987
Származó adatok 2017.03.04 11:30h
ISBN (alternatív jelölések): 615-5564-98-1, 978-615-5564-98-7
Archívum-tétel:
9786155564987 - James Fenimore, Cooper: Last of the Mohicans - Könyv

James Fenimore, Cooper (?):

Last of the Mohicans (?)

Szállítás: NémetországÚj könyveBook, e-Book, digitális könyvtermék a digitális letöltés
ISBN:

9786155564987 (?) vagy 6155564981

, ismeretlen nyelv, Új, eBook, digitális letöltés
Kategória: eBooks > Belletristik > Erzählungen
Kulcsszavak: GESCHICHTE ,THE AMERICAS ,HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS
Származó adatok 2017.03.04 11:30h
ISBN (alternatív jelölések): 615-5564-98-1, 978-615-5564-98-7
Archívum-tétel:
9786155564987 - James Fenimore Cooper: The Last of the Mohicans - Könyv

James Fenimore Cooper (?):

The Last of the Mohicans (?)

Szállítás: NémetországÚj könyveBook, e-Book, digitális könyvtermék a digitális letöltés
ISBN:

9786155564987 (?) vagy 6155564981

, ismeretlen nyelv, eKitap Projesi, Új, eBook, digitális letöltés
eBook Letölt
It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes. Still there is so much obscurity in the Indian traditions, and so much confusion in the Indian names, as to render some explanation useful. Few men exhibit greater diversity, or, if we may so express it, greater antithesis of character, than the native warrior of North America. In war, he is daring, boastful, cunning, ruthless, self-denying, and self-devoted; in peace, just, generous, hospitable, revengeful, superstitious, modest, and commonly chaste. These are qualities, it is true, which do not distinguish all alike; but they are so far the predominating traits of these remarkable people as to be characteristic. It is generally believed that the Aborigines of the American continent have an Asiatic origin. There are many physical as well as moral facts which corroborate this opinion, and some few that would seem to weigh against it. The color of the Indian, the writer believes, is peculiar to himself, and while his cheek-bones have a very striking indication of a Tartar origin, his eyes have not. Climate may have had great influence on the former, but it is difficult to see how it can have produced the substantial difference which exists in the latter. The imagery of the Indian, both in his poetry and in his oratory, is oriental; chastened, and perhaps improved, by the limited range of his practical knowledge. He draws his metaphors from the clouds, the seasons, the birds, the beasts, and the vegetable world. In this, perhaps, he does no more than any other energetic and imaginative race would do, being compelled to set bounds to fancy by experience; but the North American Indian clothes his ideas in a dress which is different from that of the African, and is oriental in itself. His language has the richness and sententious fullness of the Chinese. Philologists have said that there are but two or three languages, among all the numerous tribes which formerly occupied the country that now composes the United States. They ascribe the known difficulty one people have to understand another to corruptions and dialects. The writer remembers to have been present at an interview between two chiefs of the Great Prairies west of the Mississippi, and when an interpreter was in attendance who spoke both their languages. The warriors appeared to be on the most friendly terms, and seemingly conversed much together; yet, according to the account of the interpreter, each was absolutely ignorant of what the other said. They were of hostile tribes, brought together by the influence of the American government; and it is worthy of remark, that a common policy led them both to adopt the same subject. They mutually exhorted each other to be of use in the event of the chances of war throwing either of the parties into the hands of his enemies. Whatever may be the truth, as respects the root and the genius of the Indian tongues, it is quite certain they are now so distinct in their words as to possess most of the disadvantages of strange languages; hence much of the embarrassment that has arisen in learning their histories, and most of the uncertainty which exists in their traditions. Like nations of higher pretensions, the American Indian gives a very different account of his own tribe or race from that which is given by other people. He is much addicted to overestimating his own perfections, and to undervaluing those of his rival or his enemy; a trait which may possibly be thought corroborative of the Mosaic account of the creation. The whites have assisted greatly in rendering the traditions of the Aborigines more obscure by their own manner of corrupting names. Thus, the term used in the title of this book has undergone the changes of Mahicanni, Mohicans, and Mohegans; the latter being the word commonly used by the whites.
Több…
Kategória: Bücher
Kulcsszavak: Geschichte
Származó adatok 2017.03.04 11:30h
ISBN (alternatív jelölések): 615-5564-98-1, 978-615-5564-98-7
Archívum-tétel:
9786155564987 - James Fenimore Cooper: Last of the Mohicans - Könyv

James Fenimore Cooper (?):

Last of the Mohicans (?)

Szállítás: NémetországÚj könyv
ISBN:

9786155564987 (?) vagy 6155564981

, ismeretlen nyelv, Ekitap Projesi, Új
Free shipping
Last of the Mohicans: It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes. Still there is so much obscurity in the Indian traditions, and so much confusion in the Indian names, as to render some explanation useful. Few men exhibit greater diversity, or, if we may so express it, greater antithesis of character, than the native warrior of North America. In war, he is daring, boastful, cunning, ruthless, self-denying, and self-devoted in peace, just, generous, hospitable, revengeful, superstitious, modest, and commonly chaste. These are qualities, it is true, which do not distinguish all alike but they are so far the predominating traits of these remarkable people as to be characteristic.It is generally believed that the Aborigines of the American continent have an Asiatic origin. There are many physical as well as moral facts which corroborate this opinion, and some few that would seem to weigh against it.The color of the Indian, the writer believes, is peculiar to himself, and while his cheek-bones have a very striking indication of a Tartar origin, his eyes have not. Climate may have had great influence on the former, but it is difficult to see how it can have produced the substantial difference which exists in the latter. The imagery of the Indian, both in his poetry and in his oratory, is oriental chastened, and perhaps improved, by the limited range of his practical knowledge. He draws his metaphors from the clouds, the seasons, the birds, the beasts, and the vegetable world.In this, perhaps, he does no more than any other energetic and imaginative race would do, being compelled to set bounds to fancy by experience but the North American Indian clothes his ideas in a dress which is different from that of the African, and is oriental in itself. His language has the richness and sententious fullness of the Chinese.Philologists have said that there are but two or three languages, among all the numerous tribes which formerly occupied the country that now composes the United States. They ascribe the known difficulty one people have to understand another to corruptions and dialects. The writer remembers to have been present at an interview between two chiefs of the Great Prairies west of the Mississippi, and when an interpreter was in attendance who spoke both their languages. The warriors appeared to be on the most friendly terms, and seemingly conversed much together yet, according to the account of the interpreter, each was absolutely ignorant of what the other said.They were of hostile tribes, brought together by the influence of the American government and it is worthy of remark, that a common policy led them both to adopt the same subject. They mutually exhorted each other to be of use in the event of the chances of war throwing either of the parties into the hands of his enemies. Whatever may be the truth, as respects the root and the genius of the Indian tongues, it is quite certain they are now so distinct in their words as to possess most of the disadvantages of strange languages hence much of the embarrassment that has arisen in learning their histories, and most of the uncertainty which exists in their traditions. Like nations of higher pretensions, the American Indian gives a very different account of his own tribe or race from that which is given by other people. He is much addicted to overestimating his own perfections, and to undervaluing those of his rival or his enemy a trait which may possibly be thought corroborative of the Mosaic account of the creation.The whites have assisted greatly in rendering the traditions of the Aborigines more obscure by their own manner of corrupting names. Thus, the term used in the title of this book has undergone the changes of Mahicanni, Mohicans, and Mohegans the latter being the word commonly used by the whites. Englisch, Ebook
Több…
Származó adatok 2017.05.28 04:27h
ISBN (alternatív jelölések): 615-5564-98-1, 978-615-5564-98-7

9786155564987

Minden rendelkezésre álló könyvek megkeresése az ISBN-szám 9786155564987 összehasonlítani az árakat gyorsan és egyszerűen, és hogy azonnal.

Rendelkezésre álló ritka könyvek, használt könyvek és használt könyvek a cím "The Last of the Mohicans" a James Fenimore Cooper, Murat Ukray teljesen szerepelnek.

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